ECU Libraries Catalog

Guideline : infant feeding in areas of Zika virus transmission.

Author/creator World Health Organization
Format Electronic and Book
Publication Info Geneva : World Health Organization, 2016.
Description1 online resource (1 PDF file (viii, 32 pages)) : illustration.
Supplemental Content Direct link to resource
Subject(s)
Variant title Infant feeding in areas of Zika virus transmission
Contents ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- Financial support -- EXECUTIVE SUMMARY -- Purpose of the guideline -- Guideline development methodology -- Available evidence -- Recommendation -- Remarks -- Research priorities -- Plans for updating the guideline -- WHO GUIDELINE: INFANT FEEDING IN AREAS OF ZIKA VIRUS TRANSMISSION -- SCOPE AND PURPOSE -- BACKGROUND -- OBJECTIVES -- SUMMARY OF AVAILABLE EVIDENCE -- RECOMMENDATION -- Rationale -- Remarks -- Research priorities -- DISSEMINATION, IMPLEMENTATION AND EQUITY CONSIDERATIONS -- Dissemination -- Implementation -- Ethical and equity considerations -- Monitoring and evaluation of guideline implementation -- GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS -- Advisory groups -- Scope of the guideline, evidence appraisal and decision-making -- MANAGEMENT OF COMPETING INTERESTS -- PLANS FOR UPDATING THE GUIDELINE -- REFERENCES -- ANNEX 1. QUESTION IN POPULATION, INTERVENTION, CONTROL, OUTCOMES (PICO) FORMAT -- ANNEX 2. CASE DEFINITIONS AND MAIN DIAGNOSTIC TEST INTERPRETATIONS FOR ZIKA VIRUS -- ANNEX 3. SUMMARY OF THE CONSIDERATIONS OF THE GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT GROUP--ZIKA VIRUS AND INFANT FEEDING FOR DETERMINING THE STRENGTH OF THE RECOMMENDATION -- ANNEX 4. GRADE SUMMARY OF FINDINGS TABLE -- ANNEX 5. WHO STEERING GROUP--ZIKA VIRUS AND INFANT FEEDING -- ANNEX 6. WHO GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT GROUP--ZIKA VIRUS AND INFANT FEEDING -- ANNEX 7. PEER-REVIEWERS -- ANNEX 8. EXTERNAL RESOURCE PERSONS -- ANNEX 9. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW TEAM -- ANNEX 10. WHO SECRETARIAT .
Summary Zika virus is a mosquito-borne virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and is known to circulate in Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Pacific. Infection with Zika virus usually results in mild illness and symptoms may include fever, skin rashes, conjunctivitis, muscle and joint pain, malaise, and headache. Although Zika virus disease is generally mild, increased cases of congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome have been observed in recent outbreaks in the Americas and the Pacific and a growing body of evidence points towards a causative role for Zika virus in these neurological disorders. Current widespread transmission of the virus and detection of the virus in breast milk from two mothers with confirmed Zika virus infection has also raised questions as to whether transmission can occur during breastfeeding, a practice essential to infant and young child survival and development. However, there are currently no documented reports of Zika virus being transmitted to infants through breastfeeding and in countries with ongoing transmission of Zika virus, no adverse neurological outcomes have been reported to date in infants with postnatally acquired Zika virus disease. Based on the available evidence, which suggests that the benefits of breastfeeding for the infant and mother outweigh any potential risk of Zika virus transmission through breast milk, WHO has issued interim guidance on breastfeeding in the context of Zika virus.
Bibliography noteIncludes bibliographical references.
Source of descriptionDescription based on online resource; title from PDF title page (viewed Aug. 10, 2016).
ISBN9789241549660
ISBN9241549661

Available Items

Library Location Call Number Status Item Actions